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TES instrument decommissioned

TES collected spectral "signatures," illustrated here, of ozone and other gases in the lower atmosphere. Credit: NASA

Farewell to a Pioneering Pollution Sensor

On Jan. 31, NASA ended the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer's (TES) almost 14-year career of discovery. Launched in 2004 on NASA's Aura spacecraft, TES was the first instrument designed to monitor ozone in the lowest layers of the atmosphere directly from space. Its high-resolution observations led to new measurements of atmospheric gases that have altered our understanding of the Earth system.

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Aura is dedicated to understanding the changing chemistry of our atmosphere.




NASA Study: First Direct Proof of Ozone Hole Recovery Due to Chemicals Ban

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